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Cleaning up a vintage mustang s/plate

 
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Ben79
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Joined: 04 Jun 2011
Posts: 279
Location: Brixton, London

PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 5:22 pm    Post subject: Cleaning up a vintage mustang s/plate Reply with quote

Just got hold of a very nice sunburst '75 Mustang.

I love it!

It's had a sticker applied to the scratch plate for some time which has been removed but left a gummy residue. Really stupidly I used some acetone to wipe it off, which it did, but it also melted the surface of the scratchplate. Fortunately I didn't use very much and only on a small area so you can't see any damage but the residual sticker goo and the scratchplate plastic have now amalgamated in some areas meaning the goo can't be rubbed off - it's IN the plastic.

Is it possible to rub these down at all? I've got a dremel with various attachments. Obviously I want it to look right so I'd need to get it back to a smooth, polished finish.

Any help much appreciated.
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Pens
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Joined: 20 Apr 2006
Posts: 13750
Location: South St. Louis

PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What color is the scratchplate?

You'd be better off using a sanding block and sandpaper to scrub it off, then move up in grade to 2000 grit wetsand paper and buff it out like you would with any finish. However, don't do that if it's a printed tort guard.
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Ben79
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Joined: 04 Jun 2011
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Location: Brixton, London

PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice. Sounds like it can be saved, phew! The guard is white.
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robert(original)
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Location: somewhere in the midwest

PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i would go the sandpaper route as well, maybe start with 600, or even 800 wet with mineral spirits, i have heard people use baby oil before but i have never tried it.
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Doug
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Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 865
Location: Atlanta, Georgia and Cashiers, North Carolina

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 10:22 pm    Post subject: Whoaa Nelly Reply with quote

Ben79 wrote:
Thanks for the advice. Sounds like it can be saved, phew! The guard is white.


Before you do anything, share all this advice you're getting with a vintage expert. You have a priceless instrument (well, not literally, but you know what I mean)...last thing ya wanna do is make things any worse. Hire an expert to do expert work...and who knows, maybe the damage can be undone.

Cheers,
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othomas2
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Joined: 20 Apr 2006
Posts: 4026
Location: London

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 12:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How bad is it ?

Not just best to accept it as part of its story now ? ... along with the other accidental knocks and bruises it's had over the years. Sometimes covering something over can make it look even worse.

Is it a pretty clean overall ?
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BobArsecake
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Joined: 24 Apr 2006
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Location: Elland-Straße ist der einzige Ort für uns

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I'd rather leave as is, and think of it how Owen's put it, or get a new scratchplate, or if you're set on keeping it original and making it clean; have a professional do it.
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Ben79
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Joined: 04 Jun 2011
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Location: Brixton, London

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Is it a pretty clean overall ?


It's in pretty amazing condition for the age. Barely a mark on the body and the neck is like new. With the scratch plate fixed, it would look mint.

I think I feel so stupid and slightly guilty for melting the plate on an otherwise timewarp vintage guitar that I feel obliged to rectify my mistake.

I guess plates can be got that are indistinguishable from the vintage white 3-ply?
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othomas2
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Joined: 20 Apr 2006
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Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Mar 19, 2013 12:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can we see pics ? might be worth correcting then if that's the case...

I would stick with original if I was you.

That would personally bother me more, well... that and living in Brixton. Laughing Wink
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