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Broncomaster bass refin: oops.
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What color should it be?
YALLER
35%
 35%  [ 10 ]
TEH SEAFOAMZ
42%
 42%  [ 12 ]
Other
7%
 7%  [ 2 ]
SLOAN
14%
 14%  [ 4 ]
Total Votes : 28

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mixtape
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Joined: 04 Feb 2012
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Location: Chicago

PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 4:04 pm    Post subject: Broncomaster bass refin: oops. Reply with quote

Well, the dissertation is defended, deposited, I'm a doctor*, and there's nothing left for me to do now but, er, get a job. run4cover And last fall, I promised myself that when I finished the dissertation, I'd refinish the Broncomaster bass. It's still the original Torino red, but I can't stand having two guitars the same color, and the red Mockingbird was here first. I'm leaning strongly toward graffiti yellow, maybe switching the white pickguard and thumb rest out for black. Something like this. Black comp stripes wouldn't be out of the question, either.


I'm open to suggestions, though. Sea foam green is kind of tempting too. I think somebody on the board did a Daphne blue one once, which looked pretty great.

Anyway--understanding that I'm a total noob--what's the simplest way to get a decent-looking refin?

Also, as long as I'm taking it apart again, something else I was wondering about:
I'm not getting the sustain out of it that I want, particularly on the E string. Can I mod it or set it up differently so as to correct this, or is it just the nature of the beast with a short scale bass? I'm wondering especially if I'd get better results with a different bridge (I've still got the stock Bronco bass bridge on it, which is a pain to intonate) or different strings (unidentified--whatever astro shipped with it when I bought it).

*No, not that kind of doctor. If you wanted prescriptions written, sorry.


Last edited by mixtape on Fri Jun 20, 2014 7:18 pm; edited 4 times in total
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wwrrss
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Graffiti Yellow all the way!
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cur
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The easiest way to get an acceptable finish: Get everything from an auto parts store for a one stop shop.

600 grit sand paper, 1000 grit sand paper. Car finish rubbing compound and polish. Look though the car color touch up spray paint that they have and get a can of what you like and get another can of clear coat. (you may need more paint depending you good you are. But one can at a time is fine.

Take the body and scruff it up with some 600 grip sand paper. This will let the paint stick. Hang your body somehow by the neck screw holes. Use a kitchen paper towel and some rubbing alcohol to give it a quick rub to de dust and degrease.

Learn how to spray with spray paint. Test on some type of scrap. Hold can away from object and hit spray button then go to paint the body (don't want spurts from initial button push). Thin coats with color is better then too thick, which can cause drips. Do 50% overlaps. You will need several coats to get good coverage. Don't be greedy and do too much at once. If you get a drip, don't worry, when it dries you can use your 1000 grit (or 600) to sand it down. If you sand too much just do a touch up with the paint. take your time and be patient.

Once your base coat is down. let dry the recommended amount of time and start with you clear coat. Same thing applies - practice first with the clear coat. you want a wet coat with no runs, but if you go too thick you will get orange peel. Orange peel you can fix so it is not the end all. Actually it is almost inevitable to some point. Do multiple coats 3-5.

if at anytime you get a bug or dust just let it be until that coat is dry. you can test for dry set bu touching in a pickup cavity or the neck pocket.. Use a tweezer to get it out or a paper towel to knock it off. if you get a smudge you can sand that out quick with 1000grit.

Let dry for a couple of days before you wet sand. The can will tell you how long you need to wait. Wet sand with water or baby oil with 1000 grit. don't use too much water on the body or you could swell up screw holes. Fold the paper over itself several times and sand/rub with even pressure. Sand until you see the paper loading up the rinse the paper in the water bucket and wipe of guitar with clothe. Then keep going at it. The glossy finish will look hazy after you do this, but will come back. AVOID the edges of the body when doing the flat surfaces (unless you want that roadworn look). Close your eyes and feel the surface to test if it is smooth. you might see tiny shiny spots. That is the bottom of the orange peel pits. You can go until it is all the same look or the pits are mostly gone.

Then use rubbing compound as recommended. I use with a polish pad and a car polisher. This step will remove any minor orange peel you have. You can use a pad and elbow grease. Then go to the car polish and use a terry cloth towel. Finally use some kind of car wax- I like the spray on wet kind of wax.

If at any time in your painting or finishing you get a problem, you can always sand it out- touch up with spray paint and clear coat. Then sand to blend with 1000 grit and rubbing compound. Stop when you are happy with it or else you will go too far and mess up.

Probably 40 - 50 bucks to get a decent job.
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61fury
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 3:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sonic blue? which is more pale, sonic or daphne? I like the paler one better, mint or parchment PG. Or metallic ice blue. Shoreline gold. I'd paint my current project gold but I already have a gold guitar.
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paul_
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 4:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

61fury wrote:
Sonic blue? which is more pale, sonic or daphne? I like the paler one better, mint or parchment PG. Or metallic ice blue. Shoreline gold. I'd paint my current project gold but I already have a gold guitar.


Daphne is generally more pale than Sonic, though they're both a bit of a moving target, especially with a nitro topcoat.


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Aug wrote:
which one of you bastards sent me an ebay question asking if you can get teh kurdtz with that 64 mustang? Mad

robertOG wrote:
fran & paul are some of the original gangstas of the JS days when you'd have to say "phuck"
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astro
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Graffiti yellow would look fabulous, especially with a black pick guard! There just aren't enough yellow fenders in the world in my opinion.

I can't remember what strings I put on there... Either 95 or 100 gauge for the E string. Kinda thin... Try maybe a 105 or 110 gauge E string for a tighter feel and deeper low end. Heavier gauge short scale bass strings are hard to come by so you would most likely have to look online to find some that thick.
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mixtape
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll try heavier strings this time around. Aaand... possibly stupid questions ahead: What are the pros and cons going to be of flatwound vs. round wound?

What kind of results would I see, sustain-wise, from changing the bridge? My inclination would be to go with a top-loading bridge. Based on honeyiscool's excellent Bronco bass modding guide, this looks like my most affordable option. However, I know that threaded saddle bridges sometimes get a bad rap. Why is that?

And thanks, cur, for going through the refin process step by step. It's really helpful to see all of that information in one place. Preparatory to any of that, I assume I need to sand the old finish completely off? Or do I only need to sand it enough to rough it up for the new paint to stick?
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cur
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mixtape wrote:
Preparatory to any of that, I assume I need to sand the old finish completely off? Or do I only need to sand it enough to rough it up for the new paint to stick?


Not sure how bad of dings you have in the guitar. What I would do is get some 400/600 grit sand paper and scuff the original finish up really good. Do a proper sanding, but you don't have to take off the finish that is on there just make it is rough so the primer has something to grab on to. Where you have chips around the edges, you want to feather the finish down with the exposed wood. Your best gauge to if it is smooth is closing your eyes and running your fingers over it.

If you have bad dings or dents use JB weld to fill. the stuff is cheap and two part and wont shrink with the solvents in your paint. Mix up small batches with a tooth pick and apply to the ding. Let dry overnight and gently smooth to flush with 600 grit.

Wipe everything down with paper towels (they are great at getting rid of dust because it will get trapped in the towels fibers). Then you can use a degreaser or some isopropal to wipe down before priming. Use a high build primer from the auto body store and use the whole can. This will give you 3-4 coats. don't go too thick in one coat. You want build up bit try not to get drips. Practice on some scrap wood. This will fill in any minor bumps and pits. Sand with 600/800 grit until smooth to touch. The high build will also let you do a bit of shaping on the edges of the guitar.

Post Pics of the process Dr. Mixtape.
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mixtape
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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2013 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Procrastinating again, but I've got a revise-and-resubmit deadline looming next week, plus I've suddenly gotten a couple of jobs. In the meantime, do I want to go with flat wound or round wound strings?
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mixtape
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, I finally got around to going shopping, which ought to put me somewhat closer to finally actually starting this project (my summer did not go at all as planned). Can cur or somebody tell me whether I got the right stuff? I was guessing a bit on the paint, primer, clear coat, etc.

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cur
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 21, 2013 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK with they assortment you have, here is what I would recommend. First off, you do not have any sand paper. Depending on the finish and condition of your guitar you are going to want to, at a minimum, scuff up the pain that is on there with 600 grit. If you have dings and stuff to fix do that now as well. Light sanding with 600 and water with a little bit of dish soap will clean up the surface and get rid of any grime. Once you do this you can shoot with primer. I don't know about the stuff you have but if the surface is good any way it should work well. I usually get high build primer from the auto part store to help with any slight imperfections. Shoot a couple light coats then and lightly with 600 of needed. If your primer coat went down how you like it then hit with your yellow gloss;s enamel. Since this is a gloss enamel, you may not have to hit with clear. If the yellow goes on nice then you could probably get away with light wet sand with 1500 and 2000 grit, then buff with rubbing compound, polishing compound and finally spray wax.

so if the enamel coat is nice and shiny after you shoot it, then the sanding will dull it up to start out, but it will all come back when you go up the grits to 2000 and the the different compounds and wax.

If you go with the clear coat after the enamel coat, go for several lightish coats to build it up and avoid orange peal. Then finish with the sand papers (to be safe start with 1500) and compounds. Avoid sanding near the corner bends because it is very easy to sand through the finish at the transitions. Also, use wet sanding with water and a small drop of soap in it. wipe often with a terry cloth and rinse you sand paper often so it does not build up. When you think you have it good enough stop, going too much with any of the steps usually leads to problems.

You can go to any auto part store to get the sand papers, 600, 1500 and 2000 should get you where you want to be.
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mixtape
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I actually did get sandpaper (400, 600, and 1000 grit, if I remember correctly). It seemed self-explanatory so I didn't stick it in the picture. I'll pick up some 1500 and 2000 as well. Thanks for the clarification.
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Joey
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 1:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

when ever i spray over an existing finish, mist on the first couple coats gradually spraying heavier as you go. I've had crinkles and blisters from where they didnt play nice.... so dont shock the existing with a heavy.first coat. if your spraying over a poly finish you definitely shouldnt have a problem though
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robert(original)
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 22, 2013 4:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

joey hit the nail on the head, we talked on the phone about this.
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mixtape
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok. I'm looking to start sanding tomorrow. When I do the deed, should I tape off the shielding paint in the pickup rout and the control cavity?
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cur
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

up to you really, but the shielding will still work.
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NickS
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2013 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I missed this thread first time round so I'd just like to say:
OT: Congrats Dr.!
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mixtape
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2013 3:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Nick!

Well, a day late, a dollar short, but at least I started it (and I've got it looking shitty enough now that I'll have to finish it, like it or not Smile ). How scuffed up is "scuffed up" supposed to look? I went after it with the 600 grit, and I've got the old finish looking dull and swirly, but it doesn't feel rough. Should it, or is that good enough for the primer? And do I need to get in there and sand the neck pocket as well, or not worry about it since no one will ever see it?
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cur
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mixtape wrote:
Thanks, Nick!

Well, a day late, a dollar short, but at least I started it (and I've got it looking shitty enough now that I'll have to finish it, like it or not Smile ). How scuffed up is "scuffed up" supposed to look? I went after it with the 600 grit, and I've got the old finish looking dull and swirly, but it doesn't feel rough. Should it, or is that good enough for the primer? And do I need to get in there and sand the neck pocket as well, or not worry about it since no one will ever see it?


Should be good. You can do a quick hand scuffing to pockets for the heck of it. I would probably do it if it where mine.
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mixtape
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 06, 2013 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Once I figure out how/where to hang it up in the basement, I'm going to start hitting it with primer. I realize that I don't know the best way of getting the whole way around it, into the cutaways, etc. Any tips?
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